Netflix Rules the Roost in UK: Twice as Many Homes Have Netflix Subscriptions Than Amazon Prime

BARB (Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board) have released a new report on SVOD (Subscription Video on Demand) usage in the UK and have shown that Netflix is subscribed to in nearly twice homes in the UK than Amazon Prime. While neither SVOD companies share official subscriber numbers, reports like BARB’s give a good insight into these figures. For example, in the UK there are around 7.5 million homes with Netflix compared to Amazon’s 3.8 million and NowTV’s 1.2 million. That means a total of 9.4 million homes in the UK, that’s about 1/3 of all homes, have at least one SVOD subscription.

In terms of growth, Netflix has grown by 22% in the UK, Amazon by 51% and NowTV by 70% with an overall growth of 24% for all SVOD services.

Streaming services like Netflix are clearly becoming a staple part of TV for many people nowadays and are no longer simply niche markets. The full report also goes into a lot more detail about SVOD usage in the UK if statistics are your kind of thing.

Read the full report from BARB here: http://www.barb.co.uk/download/?file=/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/BARB-SVOD-White-Paper_FINAL.pdf

 

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Film and TV fan, creator of New On Netflix (UK, USA, Australia and Canada), dad of two amazing children, code geek and passionate about autism.

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34 thoughts on “Netflix Rules the Roost in UK: Twice as Many Homes Have Netflix Subscriptions Than Amazon Prime

  1. Have to agree with Darren Dixon amazon is pretty bad, if prime video was a stand alone service without the extras I would not have paid the annual subscription, but guess it shows that Now TV has some work to do to keep some happy viewers their pricing compared to Netflix and the like are not competitive enough to draw them in goodluck improving sky!!

    1. the draw for NowTV is probably the movies as they get the latest releases and the HBO shows through Sky Atlantic. I have the full sky package plus netflix and find i watch Netflix more than Sky though

    2. I like how it is easy to find new content on Netflix to binge on, with Amazon it is not so easy or they just do not add new content regularly I have Fire TV but use the app to find movies/series to add to my watch list. Netflix Original content is best out of the 2 services in my opinion. I like Now TV too but just lately their new content for movies have not been their best 🙁

  2. I’ve had Netflix for a few years now, and love it.

    Signed up to Prime mainly for the deliveries just before Christmas 2016. The video service is okay, but as others have said, I don’t like the interface (I’ve heard it’s better on Fire devices, but on my Roku and Smart TV it’s clunky) or the way they mix ‘free’ (included with a Prime subscription) and paid content. They recently had Now You See Me 2 for free, but Now You See Me 1 required a rental payment. Fortunately both are now on Netflix. 🙂 I do like a few of the series they have, though… The Grand Tour, Mr. Robot, Falling Water, and one or two others.

    Also signed up to the NowTV Entertainment Pass last month, since they had a year for £45. There are a few decent shows on catch-up, but I’m not sure it’s worth a full-price annual sub.

    So in short… Netflix is still king for me.

  3. We’re a big Netflix fan. We have Amazon Prime Video, but we mostly just use it for Lucifer; too much of their content doesn’t have subtitles but Netflix does a stellar job on that front, even providing subtitles for stuff that was on SyFy without them.

  4. The “s” in “sVOD” (that’s how it’s written) stands for “subscription” not “streaming”. The other kind is “tVOD” – “transactional,” ie. selling content per item like iTunes does (and NowTV and Prime do with “premium” content). The terms relate to business models, not delivery mechanisms. I’d be interested to hear how you deliver video on demand WITHOUT streaming.

    1. BTW, what you are referring to about scheduled air times is called “linear” TV, buying or renting (whatever the medium or file format) is called “retail” or “rental”, and “on demand” means that it’s made available when you want it (for example, streaming an iTunes purchase to your AppleTV is on demand, downloading it and watching it on your Mac is not). That DVD on your shelf is not “on demand”. Why should it make a difference whether the exact same data is on a DVD or in your phone’s storage?

      Services like Netflix and Prime which are delivered via the internet are called “OTT” (Over The Top) services – because they piggy-back on your ISP’s network but the ISP doesn’t make anything from it.

      Services like Sky Movies which are delivered over cable (DCT) or satellite (D-sat) are generally called NVOD (the N is for “Near” because it’s not actually on demand – it’s a bunch of channels with staggered start times so you might have to wait ten minutes for the next start).

      Catchup services like iPlayer are called “time-shifting”. Services which offer the ability to carry on watching from the same point on a different device are called “place-shifting”.

      Uhhh, what else?

      Subscriber volumes are measured in “households” not people. Last time I checked there were 34 million households in the U.K.. 17.4 million pay a subscription to a pay-TV provider (MSO – multichannel service operator). Those 17.4 million are pretty much evenly divided between Sky and Liberty Global/Virgin Media.

      There you go.

    2. Well, the point was to help you understand the document you shared as it’s pretty arcane industry stuff, but if you want to argue the toss about whatever you believe those terms mean and respond in bad grace rather than taking some friendly info as it’s meant, then go right ahead. I apologise for trying to help you out with some insider knowledge on something you posted about. I’ll not do it again. [Shrugs again]

  5. I have both.. Netflix is way ahead of Amazon which is rubbish. Amazon’s streaming is shoddy and the interface is poor. I only keep it for two shows otherwise i would become an x-customer. The to buy films are very pricey and tie you into Amazon as you don’t get a physical copy. At least with sky they actually send you the DVD in the post as well as the digital version. Plus Amazon don’t seem to listen whey you complain – maybe they are too big and don’t care about 1 voice.

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